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The Integrative Sciences program produces well-prepared alumni with knowledge in the physical and life sciences as well as practical instrument and technical skills needed to enter graduate school or a career in government or industry.

An environment favorable to interdisciplinary learning in science is provided, and through classroom and experiential learning opportunities, the student is allowed to develop his or her own interests in the areas where the different disciplines overlap.

Program Goals

Graduates of the Bachelor of Science in Integrative Sciences program are able to:

  • Demonstrate basic knowledge and technical skills to work effectively in a cross-disciplinary scientific field by demonstrating the knowledge and skills from more than one scientific disciplines;
  • Demonstrate the ability to communicate scientific information, including information that results from laboratory experimentation or fieldwork, in oral and written formats to both scientists and non-scientists;
  • Demonstrate the ability to make effective use of the library and other information resources in an academic area, including finding, conveying and critically evaluating scientific information obtained through scholarly journal articles, as well as sources obtained through an internet search;
  • Demonstrate the ability to make effective use of computers in addition to using technology as a tool in writing, collaborating with a team, illustrating, and data analysis to communicate scientific information; and,
  • Demonstrate sufficient mathematical and quantitative reasoning skills to perform competently in a professional position in the chosen field or in continuing professional training.

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Program Concentrations

Interested in a medical career? Harrisburg University Biotechnology and Integrative Science majors offer programs that set you up for success in medical, veterinary or pharmacy school. You can tailor our programs in Integrative Sciences and Biotechnology to meet the exact requirements of your chosen health professional school. Plus, the experiential learning you’ll gain through the HU academic program can help you score a health-based internship or complete a medically based applied project that will help smooth the way for your entrance into a health professional school.


Program Lead

 Catherine  Santai, Ph.D.

Catherine Santai, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Integrative Science Program Lead

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Full Time Faculty

Akeisha Belgrave, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Applied Mathematics and Biological Sciences

Natasha Clarke

Assistant Professor of Intergrated Sciences

Jacquelyn Maddox, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences and Undergraduate Program Lead for Biotechnology

J. Bernardo Mesa Cruz, M.V., Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences

Catherine Santai, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Integrative Science Program Lead

Yiben Wang, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Chemistry & Biochemistry

Jillian Yeakel

Instructor and Program Lead of Forensic Science

Corporate Faculty

Program Courses

This program requires a total of 43-50 semester hours: 15 semester hours from the core courses listed below and 28-35 semester hours completed in one of the following concentrations: Biology, Biological Chemistry, Chemistry, and Forensics. The semester hour value of each course appears in parentheses ( ).

BIOL 102 – General Biology Lecture (3 credits)

This course introduces the student to the major themes of biology, including properties of living organisms, comparison of eucaryotes vs. procaryotes, patterns of inheritance, the central dogma, mitosis and meiosis, the diversity of life in both plants and animals, classification of organisms, evolution, metabolism, photosynthesis, cell structures, basic structure of the body, infectious desease, the Hardy-Weinberg principle, biodiversity, ecosystems, and the biosphere. A broad understanding of biology and living organisms in the biosphere is developed through hand-on, mulit-modal engages learning opportunities in both the classroom and the companion laboratory compenent.

BIOL 103 – General Biology Laboratory (1 credit)

Companion laboratory component that demonstrates the major themes of biology presented in BIOL 102.

CHEM 151 – General Chemistry I Lecture (3 credits)

This course provides a general introduction to atoms and molecules, stoichiometry, states of matter, solutions, reactions, kinetics and equilibrium which serve as a prerequisite for advanced courses.

CHEM 152 – General Chemistry I Laboratory (1 credit)

Companion laboratory component that illustrates the study of chemical principles presented in CHEM 151.

PHYS 121 – General Physics I Lecture (3 credits)

This course provides an introductory treatment of classical Newtonian physics and covers kinematics in one and two dimensions, vector forces, Newton’s laws of motion, uniform circular motion, work, conservation of energy, momentum and angular momentum, rotational kinematics and dynamics, and simple harmonic motion. Emphasis is placed on the application of basic concepts through mathematical problem-solving. Applications of physics to problems in medicine are presented and medical technology is highlighted throughout the course.

PHYS 122 – General Physics I Lab (1 credit)

This laboratory course provides hands-on experience with various measurement technologies and reinforces the theoretical concepts developed in PHYS 121. Emphasis is placed on correct setup of experimental equipment to obtain valid results, troubleshooting errors, and data analysis in support of a hypothesis.

PHYS 131 – General Physics II Lecture (3 credits)

This course extends the study of classical physics and covers topics in electrostatics, magneto statics, electric circuits, electromagnetic waves, optics, interference and diffraction, and the quantum theories of atomic and nuclear physics. Mathematical problem-solving skills and applied problems in medical technology are emphasized.

PHYS 132 – General Physics II Lab (1 credit)

This laboratory course provides hands-on experience with various measurement technologies and reinforces the theoretical concepts developed in PHYS 131. Emphasis is placed on correct setup of experimental equipment to obtain valid results, troubleshooting errors, and data analysis in support of a hypothesis.

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